Welcome to my blog, the story of my continuing journey into the World of Zombie Wargames.

Monday, 21 October 2013

Car Wreck

"More bloody mess"
I was going to go with "Wreckage" as the title for this week's blog, but it sounded a bit too grandiose for what actually is just a car wreck.
I originally had a completely different idea for this vehicle, involving the removal of transfers (decals) and a re-paint, but this was shelved after the chassis broke and I was left with a shell of a vehicle.
The original vehicle was from a pack of three soft vinyl police cars from Poundland (of course).
It was stripped of the chassis, it's emergency lights and all its transfers, leaving just the shell shown on the left.
Yes, it is blood on the door !







It didn't really matter much if bits of the glue backing the transfers remained as these would give texture to the model.
The next stage was cutting out all the lights and the top where the police lights were plugged into the model and it would act as the hole where a sun-roof would fit.
The car body was soft enough for me to cut the door on three sides so it looked to be in an open position, but I could just as easily have cut the whole door out.
I also cut a piece of polystyrene to the rough dimensions of the vehicle and bevelled off a piece of scrap plastic for the base.
The polystyrene was to substitute for the destroyed interior of the vehicle.
Photos showing the shell of the car undercoated with grey primer inside and out. and the polystyrene, roughly cut to represent the internals, glued to the base.
(The large notch in the polystyrene was to accommodate the lug inside the car that the chassis plugged into.)
The two photographs below firstly show the internal part gunged with filler and given a spray of primer and the second shows both parts of the model after being given several black washes.

 (The bits of white showing are due to fitting the shell over base.)


The internal piece was given some highlights in greys whilst the shell was given its base colour of red, which is showing much brighter than it actually was.







At this stage the two pieces were glued together, before anything else was attempted.









I used many shades of browns and ochres  to represent accumulated rust and to generally dull down the model.

To the base was added a few bricks and flock (neither of which I'm particularly happy with).

Finally I gave the finished model a couple of thin coats of matt varnish.



The driver's side (if it's a left-hand drive)
Rear of the model.

Finished model alongside a clone of the original.

As I never worked on this for more than 30 minutes at a time I think overall I took less than maybe 4 hours to complete, which doesn't include time between each stage where the model was drying - the photographs only span a range of 6 days !

That's it for this week, I have started another, larger, scenery project and next week will probably be a WIP report but I'm also planning another game to once more introduce new rules to my games.

Once more I welcome my latest follower "Pitac" and here's hoping both he and my regular followers find something of interest here.

As always your comments and both welcomed and appreciated, without them I doubt I would have got this far.

28 comments:

  1. Looking at your photos, Joe, it's hard to imagine that the wrecked car started life as a cheapo Poundland car. That's a great conversion and paintjob. As a piece of scenery it is top notch.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Bryan, I'm quite pleased that its humble origins are not that apparent.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It looks really quite real! I have seen a few wrecks like that torched after a joyride and left to decay. An Excellent job, the "rust" in particular.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Clint, I didn't really make my mind up whether I wanted a burnt out car or a rusted wreck, but I reckon it turned out OK in the end

      Delete
  4. Damn...That is amazing! I have wondered myself how to do more wrecked cars, And this could help me! Cheers mate!

    Your paintjob really makes it look realistic too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks LS, "amazing" may be a bit strong though. I didn't think the paint-job was anything special tbh.

      Delete
  5. These look tremendous, well done Sir.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Michael, but there is only the one.

      Delete
  6. That looks excellent especially fine weathering. The interior from polystyrene is ingenious and works really well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Brummie, I guessed the interior wouldn't be scrutinised that closely and so it wasn't that important for me.

      Delete
  7. Great job, that interior is just brilliant. It looks like it was torched.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks CS, the "interior" such as it is was probably the easiest bit.

      Delete
  8. Very effective. I should make more terrain and scenery myself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks C6, but it was a simple bit of scenery and very satisfying to finish.

      Delete
  9. The paintjob of the finished piece is amazing! I like the reds.

    I got 3o f those too, and looks like I'll have to copy that, as I'm not too happy with the idea of using them for what they are :P

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Mathyoo, I too wasn't happy with them in their original state. Now though I've got 12 tyres and three police lights for other uses and two more potential wrecks.

      Delete
  10. Bloody good job matey. I love the interior stuff, very clever and inspirational. Brilliant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Irqan, but what interior - it's really non-existent !

      Delete
  11. Great job. I love the dirty effect.

    ReplyDelete
  12. very good painting- very realistic.

    ReplyDelete
  13. That's really good work, a lot of really good work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Fran, for something I though was really simple, that's quite a compliment.

      Delete
  14. Fantastic work, I love the rust and dirty effects, great paintjob!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Phil, I was pleased with the overall effect.

      Delete