Welcome to my blog, the story of my continuing journey into the World of Zombie Wargames.

Monday, 25 January 2016

Roller Shutter

OK, so it's not really a roller shutter as it doesn't roll and it's removed to show when it's opened.
it's the final gap in my model of "the street" I'd been working on which came to a grinding halt not just because of Xmas but also because of a backlog of printing that I needed doing.
Nearly four years ago (yes, four years!), when this model was started I did have all the external walls and fittings printed but with the passage of time several bits went missing.
The two errant door sides
Over the holiday period at least these two pieces have come to light and whilst they may be slightly curled, they have retained their original colour and are very usable.
A this would be an easy fix I set about installing the new finds into the model
It was a very easy job that I still managed  somehow to make more difficult for myself.
All the essential bits
The gap between the outer and inner walls was far slimmer than I would have liked and the gaps at either side of the door where the door would 'drop' in were a bit too narrow too. It left about 5mm either side of the door and would need a very thin piece of card.

The mainstay of many a conversion, the cereal box was used for the door itself and was carefully cut to size until if fitted snugly into the gap of the main building.
Once I was happy with the fit I edged the card with blue felt-tip as there would undoubtedly be some of it showing in when the two door sides were fitted to it.
having edged it with felt tip it made the marking on the card (to centre the door) almost impossible to read, but nevertheless it was done. 
Inner side of completed door
 
Outer facing side of door
Carefully lining up to the inner and outer faces of the door was a bit of pain but the final effect was well worth it as very little of the blue edging showed through.
Slotting in the door is a bit tight, as I wanted, but not so tight as to scrape the outer or inner printed pieces when this was done. (vast amounts of glue and burnishing may well have helped).
And that was it, in all it only took about an hour to fix the new roller shutter to the back of the "Blue Sun" general store excluding glue drying time and door "flattening" time.



The door in place.

That's it then for this week, not much I know, but nevertheless something.

21 comments:

  1. Congratulations on your modeling archaeology dig discovery! The door looks just like it belongs in that wall.

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    Replies
    1. There was no-one more surprised than me to find the bits, but I did think that I'd already mounted them on a door - I'm pleased I didn't.

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  2. Replies
    1. TThanks PC, it's no more than card-fu 101 though - very simple.

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  3. Replies
    1. Thanks Hw, I'm pleased enough with the result and thankful I didn't have to wait for another to be printed.

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  4. I was convinced that was actually corrugated paper, really impressive.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Michael, the original is a freebie model from Tommy Gun. I make my own corrugations now.

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  5. 4 years? are you sure it does not seem so long. The street continues to grow, looks like you will be starting side streets soon.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Clint (I think), I don't think I showed anything that I'd done on this model at the time, but rather I just complaind at having a sore finger after cutting out all the damn windows. Btw, side streets are BNOT on the agenda !

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  6. In situ, on the model building, it looks well. All of that dirt and grime on the print-outs really do make for realistic pieces, far better than the print-out terrain that I last used.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Roy, I do like the non-pristine look of some print-outs and similarly when I'm making or painting models I tend to leave in all the blemishes and mistakes I make on the final model. drips of glue and scatter in the wrong places are left as dirt and grime too. BUilding very quickly becoe dirty and more so when no-one is looking after them.

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  7. That is fecking well done, good looking grime and neglect!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks AL, I only wish I could take credit for it, but it's rea;;y all down to the print itself.

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  8. Nice one Joe! I have the same building, partially built, great idea for the roller shutter. I'll have to have a rethink now.

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    Replies
    1. thanks Bob,it's a nice building and a good size too, though I can't remember if I enlarged it any. A;ways good to have a think before glueing and cutting etc.

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